Teens In The News

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6/16/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Teen e-cigarette use has dropped for the first time

In 2015, 3 million teens were smoking e-cigarettes, but the number dropped to 2.2 million in 2016, according to a CDC report. Experts say this decrease could be related to more restrictions on underage buying, as well as a national campaign to reduce teen e-cigarette use. 

 

2. Teens are using fewer drugs, but overall, they're more depressed

Teens are using fewer illegal and controlled substances—like marijuana, alcohol, and cigarettes—but the rates of misuse of pain medicines like hydrocodone and oxycodone are still increasing. In addition, rates of depression have been steadily rising, with 20 percent of teen girls reporting a major depressive episode in the past year, compared to 12 percent in 2011.

 

3. McDonald's is hiring teens on Snapchat

The fast food giant is asking teens to send in a 10-second Snapchat video or "Snaplication" to apply for a position. According to Teen Vogue, this move makes sense as more than half of McDonald's employees fall within the 16 to 24 age range.

 

 

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6/9/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. 1 in 5 teens with an eating disorder seek treatment

A recent study published in Contemporary Pediatrics found that only 20 percent of teens with an eating disorder seek medical treatment. Experts believe this could be because many teens don't know they have an eating disorder, as current dieting trends can make it seem like the way they're eating is completely normal.

Ready to tackle eating disorders in class? Our story, This Football Player Had a Secret Eating Disorder, is a good place to start. 

 

2. After Harvard rescinded at least 10 acceptance letters, it's time to think about the secret social media lives of teens

Earlier this week, Harvard University rescinded the acceptances of at least 10 incoming freshman for sharing racist and offensive memes and images in a private social media group on Facebook. Teen impulsive social media behavior can be explained by science: It's all because of an underdeveloped prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that regulates behavior and judgment. 

 

3. Teen girls invent a drinking straw to detect date-rape drugs

Three Miami teens have invented the Smart Straw, which detects beverages spiked with common odorless and tasteless date rape drugs like Rohypnol, GHB, or Ketamine. The teens plan to start a crowdfunding campaign soon so their straws can be manufactured and sold. 

 

4. What happened to the teen summer job?

Despite a better unemployment rate overall, fewer teens are entering the workforce. Experts say this is because academic intuition is taking the lead—teens realize they can study more and take summer classes, making them more likely to earn a college scholarship. Plus, many teens may be working unpaid internships instead.

 

 

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6/2/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Michigan high schoolers create '13 Reasons Why Not' radio show

Students at Oxford High School have put together 13 stories of teens who have overcome their struggles with depression and suicide. On the radio show, students discuss dealing with challenges like bullying and bad relationships, and how friends helped them through.

 

2. Depression rates among teens, especially girls, is worse than previously thought

A study published in the journal Translational Psychiatry found that by age 17, 36 percent of girls and 14 percent of boys are depressed. Researchers have long known that there's a gender gap in depression among adults, but this study confirms that the gap persists among teens too, and starts at a younger age than previously thought. 

 

3. Teen pregnancy rates are at a historic low

From 2013 to 2014, the teen birth rate declined by nine percent, with the rate of births in 2014 at 24 births per 1,000 women. Researchers say this could be because being pregnant is not as socially acceptable among teens, and because teens have greater access to long-lasting birth control methods.

 

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5/26/17: 5 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. All over the world, teens lack financial literacy

In a recent survey which assessed 48,000 15-year-olds from 15 countries, only 12 percent of students were above the suggested proficiency for their age. The study also found that while 56 percent of 15-year-olds have a bank account, two-thirds of them can't understand a bank statement.

Want to test your students? They can take some of the same questions from the assessment here. And for more teaching resources, be sure to check out Choices' financial literacy content

 

2. Binge drinking is less common in this generation of teens

From 2007 to 2015, just 2.6 percent of 13-year-olds were binge drinkers—that's almost 50 percent less than the number who reported binge drinking from 1991 to 1998. But not all teen alcohol statistics are improving. From 1991 to 1998, girls were 42 percent less likely than boys to binge drink, but from 2007 to 2015, the gap started evening out, with girls being only 29 percent less likely to binge drink. 

Are you ready to teach about the dangers of alcohol? The story of Shelby Allen, a teen who died from alcohol poisoning after one night of binge drinking, will help teens understand the deadly dangers of alcohol consumption.

 

3. The science of adolescent sleep:

Teens often want to sleep in later and go to bed later than adults. Experts say this is because teens don't reach the level of drowsiness that adults and children reach until later in the day, and this, coupled with early school start times, can really affect teens' lives. When adolescence hits, teens are experiencing rapid growth and brain development, which requires rest. At the same stage of life, there's an increase in depression rates and driving accidents. Experts say that it all goes back to sleep, and suggest that making school start times 8:30 or later could help teen health overall.

Keep an eye out for our brilliant non-fiction feature on teen sleep coming in September!

 

4. Teens in large cities are more prone to psychotic episodes

Recent research published in the Schizophrenia Bulletin found that teens raised in larger cities in England and Wales were 40 percent more likely to experience psychotic episodes than teens raised in smaller cities. Out of all adolescents surveyed, 34 percent of those in urban settings reported having a psychotic experience, while 24 percent of those in rural settings reported an episode. The researchers suggest that teens in urban settings may have a heightened biological response to stress, which could lead to increased psychotic episodes.

 

5. Memorial Day begins the 100 deadliest days for teen drivers

According to the National Safety Council, Memorial Day is the start of the most dangerous time for teen drivers to be on the road. That's because during the summer months, teens have more time to be on the road, and they are often driving with friends in the car, are more likely to speed, and more likely to be out on roads later. A survey, conducted by Liberty Mutual and Students Against Drunk Driving, found that a quarter of teen accidents are related to texting, and that parents are not a good example—a third of teens have asked their parents to put their phones away on the road.

If you're thinking of combating teen driver safety before the school year ends, have them read Danger Behind the Wheel.

 

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5/19/2017: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Futuristic nap pods are helping teens get the rest they need

Hannah Vanderkooy, an 18-year-old student, often uses her school's nap pod when she's tired and overwhelmed. This pod, shaped like a combination of an spaceship and an egg, provides darkness and gentle music, to help teens take a power nap during school. This innovation comes at a time when teens are more stressed out than ever, with 69 percent not getting the recommended nine to ten hours of sleep each night.

 

2. 1.2 million teens die each year from mostly preventable causes

An international report released by the World Health Organization suggests we could be doing more to prevent adolescent deaths. For teen girls ages 15 to 19, the highest causes of death are attributed to maternal issues (having to do with poor care during pregnancy) and self-harm. For teen boys, the leading causes of death were road injuries and interpersonal conflicts.

 

3. Soccer is rated highest for boosting girls' confidence levels

A European study found that girls who play soccer are more confident than girls who don't play a sport. Even more telling? Girls playing soccer demonstrated higher levels of self-assuredness than girls involved in other sports. 

 

4. Misogyny and harassment are rampant among teens

A report published by Harvard University's Making Caring Happen project found that teens don't know how to form caring and lasting relationships. They also aren't getting the guidance they need from parents and other adults. In fact, 65 percent reported wanting "guidance on some emotional aspect of romantic relationships in a health or sex education class at school." The full report can be viewed here.

 

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5/12/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Over the past decade, the rate of suicide-related teen hospitalizations has doubled

A new study of kids ages 5 to 17 revealed that the percentage of youth diagnosed with “suicidality and serious self-harm” has doubled since 2008. The researchers said they aren't sure exactly where the cause of the problem lies, but they expect cyberbullying could be a factor. 

 

2. A New York art program offers alternative to incarceration for criminal teens

Five years ago, Rachel Barnard saw a problem of 16- and 17-year-olds being arrested for things like turnstile jumping and carrying small amounts of marijuana. She created Alternative Diversion, a program designed to help these teens get back on their feet.

 

3. Bullied teens are more likely to smoke, drink, and do drugs

A long-term study suggests that teens who were bullied at a young age are more likely to abuse substances in effort to calm adverse emotions and quell the pain of bullying.

 

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5/5/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. New Zealand rating requires teens to watch 13 Reasons Why with a parent

After the release of Netflix's controversial show 13 Reasons Why, which graphically depicts teen suicide and rape, New Zealand has issued a new rating that bans anyone under 18 from viewing the show without adult supervision. The New Zealand government said they made this decision because the show "ignores the relationship between suicide and the mental illness that often accompanies it."

 

2. Facebook knows when teens feel insecure

A 23-page leaked Facebook report reveals that the social media site can keep track of teen moods, such as when they're feeling overwhelmed, defeated, or anxious. The scary part? This information was shared with an advertiser, according to USA Today.

 

3. Here's what today's teens are afraid of

A group of Texas teens agreed to keep video diaries for a few days to record their fears and anxieties. Many of them reported fears about the future, being on their own, and being judged on their appearance.

 

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4/28/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy--that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1.  Despite the stereotype, teens aren't glued to their devices

A recent poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research revealed that 60 percent of teens have taken a break from technology for various reasons. According to the teens ages 13-17 who were surveyed, social media breaks are typically a week or longer, and more often taken by boys.

 

2. A tuition-free school is helping teens recover from opioid addiction

Opioid addiction affects many teens (1,100 teens begin misusing pills each day) but many treatment centers only accept adults. That's where recovery schools, like the Hope Academy in Indianapolis, are making a difference. The school has 41 teenagers who have abused drugs like marijuana, alcohol, painkillers and heroin. These students recover in a community of acceptance and safety, where they know they aren't alone. 

 

3.  Doctors in Arizona wonder if uptick in suicidal teens is related to Netflix's 13 Reasons Why

Netflix's new series, 13 Reasons Why, centers around the death of Hannah Baker, who narrates the show post-humously through a series of 13 tapes, each targeted at a teen who is a reason for her death. Doctors in a Glendale, Arizona emergency room say they sometimes see up to seven suicidal teens in a day, but since the show's release, they've been seeing up to 18.

 

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4/21/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1.  When talking to teens about stress, avoid 'When I was your age' anecdotes

Teens who are struggling with massive amounts of stress often refuse help from adults. This may be because of the way adults approach the issue; experts say that parents who use anecdotes of success from their own childhood may be prompting a communication breakdown. "Teenagers are looking for proof that their parents don't understand them and bringing up these examples only confirms that you're not on the same wavelength," explains psychologist Sheryl Gonzalez Ziegler.

 

2. These high school girls invented a solar-powered shelter for the homeless

Twelve junior and senior high school girls from California have invented a solar-powered homeless shelter. The girls are from a low-income community, so they are often confronted with homelessness. Many of them also come from immigrant families, and hope their invention will be able to benefit refugees. 

 

3. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine says school should start no earlier than 8:30 a.m.

In their official statement, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, the AASM has taken a stance on school start times. They say starting after 8:30 a.m. will help ensure student attendance, timeliness, and behind-the-wheel safety. 

 

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4/14/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. New survey reveals teens' favorite things

A new survey from Piper Jaffray looked at 5,500 teens and found that Generation Z consumes even more than Millennials. Their taste is different too, as today's teens are more likely to splurge on food rather than fashion. They also love shopping on Amazon and eating at Chick-fil-A. For a snapshot of the results, check out this infographic. 

 

2. Could parental consent be skewing studies on teens?

To participate in studies on mental health, teens have to get parental consent. Researchers worry this could make it difficult to make advances in adolescent psychology in general, but especially in cases where alcohol and drug use are being studied.

 

3.  Texas has the highest rate of repeat teen pregnancy in the country

Out of all the states, Texas has the highest rate of girls becoming pregnant for a second or even third time. The epidemic costs the state more than $1.1 billion, and costs teen girls even more in emotional repercussions. That's why Rep. Sarah Davis (R-Houston) is proposing a bill to allow teen parents to access contraception without the permission of their parents. 

 

4. A high school in Baltimore uses teacing techniques from early childhood education

The idea behind the teaching methods at City Neighbors High School in Baltimore, Maryland is simply to have fun. According to school leaders, the typical American high school can sometimes feel like a factory, grinding out students and pushing them through the system. But, taking a break to discuss simple, even silly concepts--like why Cool Ranch Doritos are the best--can help classrooms foster friendliness and fun. 

 

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