Teens In The News

8/11/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Smartphones are making kids unhappy

A professor of psychology at San Diego State University refers to the current generation of teens as "iGen," given the fact that they're the first to grow up with smartphones. She says they're more emotionally and psychologically vulnerable, and could be approaching "the worst mental health crisis in decades."

 

2. Dangerous teen behavior may be caused by culture, not biology

Teen risk-taking behavior is often attributed to brain changes, but criminologists at Penn State University found that might not actually be accurate. Their study looked at crime rates in Taiwan—where teen culture is less individualistic than it is in America—and found that crime peaked in adults in their late twenties and early thirties. If teen risk-taking behavior was biological, the peak crime rate wouldn't differ from country to country—suggesting American culture influences its teen crime rates.

 

3. Suicide rates for teen girls are at an all-time high

For teen girls ages 15 to 19, the suicide rate in America is the highest it has been in 40 years. And from 2007 to 2015, the suicide rate for teen girls rose 50 percent. Experts aren't sure why the increase is so high, but suggest factors such as mental health issues, substance abuse, and even the instability of the American economy.

 

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8/4/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Binge drinking drops among teenagers

According to a new study, the number of teens who participated in binge drinking decreased between 1991 and 2015, particularly among boys and economically advantaged teens. Experts suggest that the overall decline may be due to policy laws, like stricter regulations on ID checks. 

 

2. Social media can cause depression

Madison Holleran had a picture-perfect life on social media, but in 2014, the 19-year-old college track star committed suicide. According to experts, many teens have trouble understanding the difference between reality and social media—and for teens who struggle with mental health disorders, social media can be a trigger for things like depression and anxiety.

 

3. Teens of the Seventh Generation of Native Americans are defying the odds

Jacob Rosales is a Native American teen who lives on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. He's part of the Seventh Generation of his tribe, the generation prophesied to spearhead renewal. Despite adverse situations on the reservation, Rosales is going to college, with plans to be a medical doctor. "It’s not our fault that one-third of us drop out of school. That we participate in the labor force at a lower rate than any other racial group. That our men are incarcerated at four times the rate of their white peers," he told The Atlantic.

 

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7/28/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Snapchat is where teens consume most news

It's estimated that teens age 13-18 spend an average of nine hours a day consuming media, and when it comes to news, they aren't going to news sites to keep up. Instead, they're checking apps, mostly Snapchat and Twitter. That means it's even more important that they understand how to identify fake news. Our story, Which One is #FakeNews?, can help you bring a lesson on media literacy and safe newsgathering to your class. 

 

2. In other Snapchat news, experts warn that streaks can hook teens

Experts are concerned that incentivized apps can become habit-forming for teens. One such Snapchat feature requires users to send a snap each day for three days to start a Snapstreak. If one day is missed, the Snapstreak count will go back to zero. This can create hierarchies of friendships that make teens feel like they'll disappoint others if they break the streak.

 

3. Study finds that teen obesity may be linked to risk of colon cancer

A long-term study published in the journal Cancer looked at more than a million Israeli men and more than 700,000 Israeli women from 1967 to 2002. Those who were overweight or obese at 17 (even if they were healthy in general) showed about a 50 percent increase in risk of colon cancer as an adult. 

 

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7/21/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Heavy drinking as a teen can lead to "dire" effects on brain function

A study published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology found that heavy binge-drinking in teens and young adults can harm memory, attention, language, awareness, and consciousness. Because the brain is going through substantial growth during adolescence, it's important for teens to understand the impact alcohol can have on their development. 

For more information on the dangers of teen alcohol use, read our story One Deadly Night.

 

2. Teen marijuana use linked to depression

A study published in the journal Addiction looked at more than 500 students ages 12-15 from Seattle-area middle schools, and then followed up when the students were 18. Researchers found that teens with chronic or severe depression were more likely to develop a cannabis-use disorder. The findings suggest that having interventions for depression at a younger age will curb the risk of teens developing a cannabis-use disorder later in life. 

 

3. More students are getting A's, but SAT scores are decreasing

The good news is that 47 percent of American students graduated with an A-average in 2016, compared with 38.9 percent in 1998. But when it comes to SAT scores, the average of American students fell from 1,026 to 1,002 on a 1,600-point scale. 

 

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7/14/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Traditional bullying is still more prominent than cyberbullying

A recent study in England reported that even amidst the growth of social media, less than 1 percent of regularly bullied teens report being cyberbullied, while 27 percent report experiencing traditional bullying. Overall, 30 percent of teens reported regular bullying over a span of two months. "Despite common perceptions and the growth of the online world for teenagers, our study finds that cyberbullying, on its own, is relatively rare, with face-to-face bullying remaining most common among teenagers," says lead author Andrew Przybylski.

 

2. Snapchat's new "Snap Map" poses dangers to teens

The app's new "Snap Map" location feature, unveiled June 21, allows anyone who is friends with a user to see their location on a map. According to Snapchat's parent guide, "Snapchatters can enable Ghost Mode in their settings at any time, which will cause them to disappear from the map within seconds."

 

3. Teen girl electrocuted while holding a cellphone in the bath

Madison Coe, 14, of Lubbock, Texas, was electrocuted when using her smartphone in the bathtub. Her grandmother said it appeared that she either was plugging her phone in or had started using it while it was charging.

 

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7/7/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. 50 percent of teens report feeling addicted to their phones

A recent study in the journal Child Development is the first to prove there's a link between teen screen time and mental health. The study linked nighttime screen time to an increase in anxiety and depression and a decrease in self esteem. 

 

2. Ethnic diversity benefits students in middle school

A new study of 4,302 sixth-graders around Los Angeles found that ethnic diversity makes middle schools more welcoming. The study found that the more diverse a school was, the more likely all students "reported feeling safer in school, less lonely, and less likely to be victimized."

 

3. Every senior at this low-income high school was accepted to college

For the first time in it's history, Ballou High School in Washington D.C. had a college-acceptance rate of 100 percent. Last year, only three percent of students met the city's English standards, none of them passed math, and the graduation rate was only 57 percent. 

 

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6/30/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Teens who report being bullied are more likely to have gun access

A new study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that teens who report being bullied are three times more likely than teens who haven't been bullied to report ability to access a gun. The study surveyed more than 10,000 teens, asking about past bullying, and if they would have access to a loaded gun without the permission of an adult. The study found that 19 percent of teens suffer traditional bullying, two percent suffer cyberbullying, and six percent report both. Of the teens that reported both forms of bullying, 15 percent had access to a loaded gun.

 

2. The presence of a smartphone in a room can reduce brain power

A new study found that just having a smartphone in the same room "reduces available cognitive capacity and impairs cognitive functioning." The study leaders said your subconscious mind may not be thinking about the phone, but it's the brain power to not think about the phone that uses your cognitive capacity. This study didn't look at teens in particular, but may be an interesting one to share with teens to get them thinking.

 

3. Teens fight back after historical sign is defaced

A landmark sign in Mississippi, commemorating the death of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old boy killed in 1955 for allegedly whistling at a white woman, has been defaced. In response, students from a St. Louis non-profit that teaches civil rights leadership decided to cover the vandalized sign with messages of hope. They posted retellings of Till's story, drawings of him, and other messages, to show that history can't be erased, even if a sign is destroyed.

 

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6/23/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Teens are just as sedentary as 60-year-olds

According to a new study published in Preventative Medicine, 19-year-olds are just as sedentary as 60-year-olds. The World Health Organization states that kids and teens should get about an hour of moderate to vigorous activity each day, but the study found that 50 percent of teen boys and 75 percent of teen girls did not meet that recommendation.

 

2. No, teens don't hate you. It's just summer.

Teens often seem removed and distant, but this shouldn't be taken personally—it could be a sign of a healthy teen, experts say. That's because teens need alone time as they experience psychological changes and develop independence.

 

3. These teens are competing to remember.

In Hershey, Pennsylvania, a group of teens just won first place in an interesting sport: memorization. They studied in chaotic, loud environments, like amusement parks, so they'd be ready for the USA Memory Championships. Their teacher mentioned that since training began, the teens' test scores and GPA have noticeably improved. 

 

4. Out of high school, into real life

For many teens, graduating from high school doesn't mean going straight to college. In fact, this year nearly 30 percent of American teens will head straight into the workforce. Some teens profiled are headed to the Marines, to work in family businesses, or to become welders—and they're all dreaming big.

 

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6/16/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Teen e-cigarette use has dropped for the first time

In 2015, 3 million teens were smoking e-cigarettes, but the number dropped to 2.2 million in 2016, according to a CDC report. Experts say this decrease could be related to more restrictions on underage buying, as well as a national campaign to reduce teen e-cigarette use. 

 

2. Teens are using fewer drugs, but overall, they're more depressed

Teens are using fewer illegal and controlled substances—like marijuana, alcohol, and cigarettes—but the rates of misuse of pain medicines like hydrocodone and oxycodone are still increasing. In addition, rates of depression have been steadily rising, with 20 percent of teen girls reporting a major depressive episode in the past year, compared to 12 percent in 2011.

 

3. McDonald's is hiring teens on Snapchat

The fast food giant is asking teens to send in a 10-second Snapchat video or "Snaplication" to apply for a position. According to Teen Vogue, this move makes sense as more than half of McDonald's employees fall within the 16 to 24 age range.

 

 

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6/9/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. 1 in 5 teens with an eating disorder seek treatment

A recent study published in Contemporary Pediatrics found that only 20 percent of teens with an eating disorder seek medical treatment. Experts believe this could be because many teens don't know they have an eating disorder, as current dieting trends can make it seem like the way they're eating is completely normal.

Ready to tackle eating disorders in class? Our story, This Football Player Had a Secret Eating Disorder, is a good place to start. 

 

2. After Harvard rescinded at least 10 acceptance letters, it's time to think about the secret social media lives of teens

Earlier this week, Harvard University rescinded the acceptances of at least 10 incoming freshman for sharing racist and offensive memes and images in a private social media group on Facebook. Teen impulsive social media behavior can be explained by science: It's all because of an underdeveloped prefrontal cortex, the part of the brain that regulates behavior and judgment. 

 

3. Teen girls invent a drinking straw to detect date-rape drugs

Three Miami teens have invented the Smart Straw, which detects beverages spiked with common odorless and tasteless date rape drugs like Rohypnol, GHB, or Ketamine. The teens plan to start a crowdfunding campaign soon so their straws can be manufactured and sold. 

 

4. What happened to the teen summer job?

Despite a better unemployment rate overall, fewer teens are entering the workforce. Experts say this is because academic intuition is taking the lead—teens realize they can study more and take summer classes, making them more likely to earn a college scholarship. Plus, many teens may be working unpaid internships instead.

 

 

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