Teens In The News

Photo credit: Steve Debenport/iStockphoto

5/19/2017: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Futuristic nap pods are helping teens get the rest they need

Hannah Vanderkooy, an 18-year-old student, often uses her school's nap pod when she's tired and overwhelmed. This pod, shaped like a combination of an spaceship and an egg, provides darkness and gentle music, to help teens take a power nap during school. This innovation comes at a time when teens are more stressed out than ever, with 69 percent not getting the recommended nine to ten hours of sleep each night.

 

2. 1.2 million teens die each year from mostly preventable causes

An international report released by the World Health Organization suggests we could be doing more to prevent adolescent deaths. For teen girls ages 15 to 19, the highest causes of death are attributed to maternal issues (having to do with poor care during pregnancy) and self-harm. For teen boys, the leading causes of death were road injuries and interpersonal conflicts.

 

3. Soccer is rated highest for boosting girls' confidence levels

A European study found that girls who play soccer are more confident than girls who don't play a sport. Even more telling? Girls playing soccer demonstrated higher levels of self-assuredness than girls involved in other sports. 

 

4. Misogyny and harassment are rampant among teens

A report published by Harvard University's Making Caring Happen project found that teens don't know how to form caring and lasting relationships. They also aren't getting the guidance they need from parents and other adults. In fact, 65 percent reported wanting "guidance on some emotional aspect of romantic relationships in a health or sex education class at school." The full report can be viewed here.

 

For more Teens In The News, be sure to check out our past updates: 

 

 

Mark Nazh/Shutterstock

5/12/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy—that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Over the past decade, the rate of suicide-related teen hospitalizations has doubled

A new study of kids ages 5 to 17 revealed that the percentage of youth diagnosed with “suicidality and serious self-harm” has doubled since 2008. The researchers said they aren't sure exactly where the cause of the problem lies, but they expect cyberbullying could be a factor. 

 

2. A New York art program offers alternative to incarceration for criminal teens

Five years ago, Rachel Barnard saw a problem of 16- and 17-year-olds being arrested for things like turnstile jumping and carrying small amounts of marijuana. She created Alternative Diversion, a program designed to help these teens get back on their feet.

 

3. Bullied teens are more likely to smoke, drink, and do drugs

A long-term study suggests that teens who were bullied at a young age are more likely to abuse substances in effort to calm adverse emotions and quell the pain of bullying.

 

For more Teens In The News, be sure to check out our past updates: 

 

 

 

 

 

wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock

5/5/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. New Zealand rating requires teens to watch 13 Reasons Why with a parent

After the release of Netflix's controversial show 13 Reasons Why, which graphically depicts teen suicide and rape, New Zealand has issued a new rating that bans anyone under 18 from viewing the show without adult supervision. The New Zealand government said they made this decision because the show "ignores the relationship between suicide and the mental illness that often accompanies it."

 

2. Facebook knows when teens feel insecure

A 23-page leaked Facebook report reveals that the social media site can keep track of teen moods, such as when they're feeling overwhelmed, defeated, or anxious. The scary part? This information was shared with an advertiser, according to USA Today.

 

3. Here's what today's teens are afraid of

A group of Texas teens agreed to keep video diaries for a few days to record their fears and anxieties. Many of them reported fears about the future, being on their own, and being judged on their appearance.

 

Want more news about teens? Be sure to check out our past updates: 

Darren Baker/Shutterstock

4/28/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you’re busy--that’s why we’re keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1.  Despite the stereotype, teens aren't glued to their devices

A recent poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research revealed that 60 percent of teens have taken a break from technology for various reasons. According to the teens ages 13-17 who were surveyed, social media breaks are typically a week or longer, and more often taken by boys.

 

2. A tuition-free school is helping teens recover from opioid addiction

Opioid addiction affects many teens (1,100 teens begin misusing pills each day) but many treatment centers only accept adults. That's where recovery schools, like the Hope Academy in Indianapolis, are making a difference. The school has 41 teenagers who have abused drugs like marijuana, alcohol, painkillers and heroin. These students recover in a community of acceptance and safety, where they know they aren't alone. 

 

3.  Doctors in Arizona wonder if uptick in suicidal teens is related to Netflix's 13 Reasons Why

Netflix's new series, 13 Reasons Why, centers around the death of Hannah Baker, who narrates the show post-humously through a series of 13 tapes, each targeted at a teen who is a reason for her death. Doctors in a Glendale, Arizona emergency room say they sometimes see up to seven suicidal teens in a day, but since the show's release, they've been seeing up to 18.

 

For more teens in the news, be sure to check out our past updates:

Klubovy/iStockphoto

4/21/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1.  When talking to teens about stress, avoid 'When I was your age' anecdotes

Teens who are struggling with massive amounts of stress often refuse help from adults. This may be because of the way adults approach the issue; experts say that parents who use anecdotes of success from their own childhood may be prompting a communication breakdown. "Teenagers are looking for proof that their parents don't understand them and bringing up these examples only confirms that you're not on the same wavelength," explains psychologist Sheryl Gonzalez Ziegler.

 

2. These high school girls invented a solar-powered shelter for the homeless

Twelve junior and senior high school girls from California have invented a solar-powered homeless shelter. The girls are from a low-income community, so they are often confronted with homelessness. Many of them also come from immigrant families, and hope their invention will be able to benefit refugees. 

 

3. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine says school should start no earlier than 8:30 a.m.

In their official statement, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, the AASM has taken a stance on school start times. They say starting after 8:30 a.m. will help ensure student attendance, timeliness, and behind-the-wheel safety. 

 

For more news about teens, check out our previous updates:

 

 

 

Nonwarit/Shutterstock

4/14/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. New survey reveals teens' favorite things

A new survey from Piper Jaffray looked at 5,500 teens and found that Generation Z consumes even more than Millennials. Their taste is different too, as today's teens are more likely to splurge on food rather than fashion. They also love shopping on Amazon and eating at Chick-fil-A. For a snapshot of the results, check out this infographic. 

 

2. Could parental consent be skewing studies on teens?

To participate in studies on mental health, teens have to get parental consent. Researchers worry this could make it difficult to make advances in adolescent psychology in general, but especially in cases where alcohol and drug use are being studied.

 

3.  Texas has the highest rate of repeat teen pregnancy in the country

Out of all the states, Texas has the highest rate of girls becoming pregnant for a second or even third time. The epidemic costs the state more than $1.1 billion, and costs teen girls even more in emotional repercussions. That's why Rep. Sarah Davis (R-Houston) is proposing a bill to allow teen parents to access contraception without the permission of their parents. 

 

4. A high school in Baltimore uses teacing techniques from early childhood education

The idea behind the teaching methods at City Neighbors High School in Baltimore, Maryland is simply to have fun. According to school leaders, the typical American high school can sometimes feel like a factory, grinding out students and pushing them through the system. But, taking a break to discuss simple, even silly concepts--like why Cool Ranch Doritos are the best--can help classrooms foster friendliness and fun. 

 

 For more news about teens, check out our past updates:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tommaso79/Shutterstock

4/7/17: 4 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. A California teen replaced bathroom mirrors with encouraging messages

Sabrina Astle, 17, wanted to make a difference in her school, so she replaced the girls' bathroom mirrors with inspiring messages, like "You are beautiful" and "You are loved." According to ABC News, Sabrina thought her peers would be cheered by her act, but she didn't realize it would have such a lasting positive impact. 

 

2. Could Instagram have health benefits for teens?

A new study conducted by researchers in Belgium revealed that while frequent Instagram can be linked to depression, it also makes teens feel closer to friends--which correlates with lower levels of depression. 

 

3. Chicago may require teens to show a college acceptance letter to graduate

A plan proposed by Chicago's mayor Rahm Emanuel would require students to show an acceptance of admission to a four-year university, a community college, a trade school or apprenticeship, an internship, or a branch of the armed services in order to graduate. Said Emanuel: "We want to make 14th grade universal. That's the new goal line."

 

4. Study reveals how parent snooping affects teens

A new study in the Journal of Adolescence suggests that parental snooping may actually make teens more sneaky. Experts say that more often than not, parental privacy invasions will backfire. But there may be a solution, or at least a starting place: communication.

 

For more Teens in the News, check out our past updates: 

Making school start times later may not benefit students. Photo credit: Klubovy/iStockphoto

3/31/17: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Video games tied to sexism in teenagers

A recent study surveyed more than 13,000 French teens and found that there was a positive correlation between video game play and a sexist view of women. Researchers say this is because women are underrepresented in video games--and when they are included, they are depicted as sex objects. 

 

2. Later school start times may be counterproductive to teen rest

New research from Harvard Medical School and the University of Surrey suggests that making school start times later (in an effort to align with teen circadian rhythms) may not actually be beneficial for students. This is because teens who get to sleep in also tend to stay up late--and therefore increase their artificial-light exposure, which can also impact circadian rhythm. One solution to this problem? Turn the lights down in the evening. 

 

3. Teen girls are defying the mean-girl stereotype on YouTube

There's now a slew of teenage girls who are defying the "mean girl" teen stereotype by posting wholesome content on YouTube channels. These teens are following in the footsteps of 13-year-old JoJo Siwa and her trademark hair bow--an emblem of self-worth and kindness that's helped her land a multi-platform deal with Nickelodeon. While some see this move as positive, others are critical of JoJo's success and the example it sets for other teens.

 

For more Teens in the News, check out our past updates: 

 

 

Rawpixel.com/Shutterstock

3/24/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. Teen opioid addiction often starts in the doctor's office

A recent study, done by researchers at the University of Michigan, tracked teen opioid use from 1976-2015. The findings show that among adolescents, there is a link between originally being prescribed a drug for medical reasons and later taking it for nonmedical reasons. The study confirmed that since 2013, opioid use has been declining among teens. 

 

2. Some states send teens to adult prisons

In New York and North Carolina, anyone who is 16 is qualified to be tried as an adult. In Texas, the age is 17. Georgia, Missouri, Michigan, and Wisconsin have similar regulations. Many lawmakers are beginning to realize that teen incarceration is not the best option.  Rather than incarcerating young people, some states, like Connecticut--where they recognize adults at 18--send teens to "diversion programs designed to help them develop more constructive behavior," instead of spending the money to incarcerate them.

 

3. In news literacy class, students are learning to separate fact from fiction

Marisol Solano teaches news literacy at Intermediate School 303 in Coney Island, Brooklyn, focusing on teaching her students how to determine if news is real or fake. At I.S. 303, teachers understand that fake news is more than fabricated new stories, but an overall problem of misinformation, and the only way to combat it is by teaching students to evaluate and fact-check the media they consume. 

 

For more Teens in the News, be sure to check out our past updates: 

 

Shutterstock

3/17/2017: 3 Articles You Need to Read This Week

We know you're busy--that's why we're keeping up on the news for you. Here are some of the latest articles about teen health that are worth your time. Check back every Friday for more headlines you may have missed!

 

1. American teenagers may be replacing drug use with smartphones

Researchers at the National Institute on Drug Abuse have a hunch. They've noticed that while the "social acceptability" of marijuana has increased, the use of the drug by high school students has actually decreased. "Playing video games, using social media, that fulfills the necessity of sensation seeking, their need to seek novel activity," says Columbia University researcher Dr. Silvia Martins. Though the theory still needs more research, Dr. Martins believes it is "highly plausible."

 

2. Teens in Chicago are learning science-backed methods for conflict resolution

Lauryn Hill, a Chicago high school student, has lost two friends to violent crimes--a growing problem in the Chicago area. Recently, Hill participated in a new training program called CHILL that helps teens combat violent crime. The program was designed using neuroscience research from Yale University in tandem with relationship research from the Gottmann Institute. CHILL instructors role-play conflict scenarios and have students critique the situations as they go from "potentially calm" to "dangerous."

 

3. Most teens with opioid addiction don't receive the proper treatment

Data shows that 26 percent of adult heroin addicts received medication for their addiction, while only 2 percent of teens were treated. For those addicted to opiates, 12 percent of adults received medication, while the number of teens who received an addiction medication as part of their treatment amounted to less than 1 percent. Around 500,000 American teens use prescription opiates every year, and around ten percent will become addicted. Medication-assisted treatment is just as useful for treating teens as it is for adults, says Dr. Lisa Marsch of Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth in New Hampshire. 

For more information on the opioid epidemic and how it impacts teens, be sure to check out our story, "Heroin Took Over Our Town."

 

For more Teens in the News, check out our past updates: